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Older people go out to the movies less? Or, do we just lack patience?

November 21st, 2009 No comments

It was interesting to discuss Chuck Tryon’s Reinventing Cinema. Of particular interest: Tryon’s assertion that as people get older they don’t go to the movies as often. I agree with that. However, the reasons are less related to age, than with the fact that movie DVDs come out shortly after a movie closes in the theater, DVD prices are low, and the high definition televisions and DVD players are more common.

Or, is it because as we get older we become less patient?

 

The video is funny, but also full of such truth. Then again, cells phones in theaters are a galactic nuisance:

 And then of course there is always the delight of movie theater food:

 

Thinking About Viral Culture and Time-Shifting

November 15th, 2009 No comments

I’m not sure where I stand on this viral culture thing. On the one hand, I appreciate its myriad distractions; on the other, I curse these distractions as they help keep me from getting work done.

Lost in the shuffle of our discussion of Bill Wasik’s “And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture,” was Wasik’s mention of the all-too-useful “time-shifting” (p. 185). Time-shifting is a term to describe the delaying of one’s gratification for a cultural nugget to be consumed at a later date. By employing this mind-set, we can combat the ephemeral nature of popular culture today. I wonder why the notion of delayed gratification is not so well discussed in popular culture anymore, as if Fundamental Christianity somehow held the patent on such behavior.

This technique, I believe, can be of particular use to myself for all manner of entertainment, for example. Why buy that new videogame today, for $60, when it can be had in two or three months for $30 or $40? The same could be said for new books, movies, or music. While Wasik was primarily arguing for time-shifting’s use as a way to get away from the hype that surrounds the release of a new cultural diversion, I think this type of action is useful for other reasons.

By employing time-shifting, we can combat the flakiness that is plaguing popular culture. I think this is what Wasik was getting at when he discussed Indie music in such detail. Cultural works should not need to be so emblematic of a particular era of time, or they risk becoming irrelevant very quickly. As writers, we can probably appreciate this aspect of Wasik’s discussion.

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Also, I came across an article by Simon Dumenco that was laid out in bullet-point fashion that discussed Wasik’s book. I liked the article because it shed some light on the book, and it was a quick read, with seemingly little time wasted in the normal intricacies of professional feature-writing. One of the comments for the article complemented the author on how this bullet-point style was appropriate for the subject matter. It also made me wonder how much my attention span has been compromised from spending so much time on the web.

One of the things that caught my attention in this article is that the Flash Mobs were a metaphor for the vapid nature of viral culture. This makes me think that Wasik was not at first convinced of his argument until the end of the book.

Anyway, here’s a video of Larry Lessig pwning Andrew Keen on the merits of amateur Internet culture. It’s germane to the topic because Keen despises consumer-produced media, which Lessig champions it.

Some thoughts on YouTube & Remixing

November 13th, 2009 No comments

Since I am assigned with writing the section on YouTube and Remixing – something I have never done and know little to nothing about – I began researching the topic to bring this completely new information to the essay.

Lawrence Lessig, the founder of Creative Commons, appears in two notable YouTube videos. The video not only shows Lessig talking about remixing and culture, but also shows some remixed videos. It’s a pretty fascinating exploration of the topic.

 

Here is an even more fascinating series of YouTube videos by LiberalViewer discussing his struggle over fair use with Viacom and how the situation was resolved with the assistance of the ACLU. It sounds pretty stress producing.

Part 1

Part 2

Video regarding information literacy

October 17th, 2009 No comments

This is a very interesting YouTube video regarding information literacy called e-literate produced by the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies hosted on YouTube by Howard University for their freshman seminar. The video inclues some historical perspective and works its way all the way to present with information overload through the information we can access. It’s a very long one (almost 9 minutes) so be sure you have the time to view it. It is definitely worth a look

Categories: literacy, YouTube Tags: ,

A YouTube video relating to blogs and making money

September 18th, 2009 1 comment

I thought this was appropriate, given that we have discussed working on the internet. I also, thought it was an interesting YouTube with relation to blogging in general – the video is titled: How to Make Money From Your Blog

Categories: YouTube Tags: , , ,